15 impolite manners to avoid at a museum (1)

11 February 2019
Also, ensure your belongings are not bulky, so you don’t accidentally throw down some valuable art object.

It doesn’t matter if you visit only classic museums or on the opposite choose contemporary art spaces. Any kind of museum has a list of general regulations that both help visitors receive a maximally fulfilling experience, and ensure artworks safety. Museums care a lot about the halls and exhibits on display, so pay attention to the below do’s and don’ts.

Do not make noise

If you are loud, this behavior damages everybody else’s time. There is hardly anything as irritating and distracting as someone’s kids shouting, or a group of people audibly discussing things that mildly speaking should not belong with a museum place. When you come to a museum expecting some quiet time and find this, your attempt to have some nice time turns a failure. Do not use rooms and galleries of a museum for funny conversations – use its café instead. Your voice should be low and quiet.

Watch your bag

Before entering a museum make sure you have nothing heavy with you, so it doesn’t prevent you from paying all of your attention to artworks you came there for. Also, ensure your belongings are not bulky, so you don’t accidentally throw down some valuable art object.

Do not jostle for an art object

Do not jostle for an art object

 

Do not jostle for an art object

Most of us – green art fans too – know the world’s genius artists and their most famous works, such as Mona Lisa by Leonardo Da Vinci and The Scream by Edvard Munch. Of course, if you find yourself in the same room with their original versions, it may feel a little overwhelming. Bear in mind any masterpiece has its “private space”, and crowding around it threatens its safety. Wait for your turn to come closer to an art object and do not push visitors around you in a do-or-die attempt to reach it.

Do not obstruct art objects

You are allowed to explore artworks from a closer distance, but do not prevent other visitors from watching them too, by staying in front of an exhibit for too long. Although it is obvious, we should also mention that putting yourself in front of other visitors viewing an object so you can see it better is an absolute “no”.

Do not obstruct art objects

Do not obstruct art objects

 

No talking over the phone

Not only making and receiving calls ruins other people’s experience, it does the same to yours. In case there’s a need for communication, use text messages. Some museums have tougher rules though and prohibit making calls anywhere but in the entrance hall.

Post new pictures after your visit is over

Having a great museum visit is hardly possible when it’s interrupted by posting what you see in social networks. Waiting for a different time to show your Instagram friends the masterpieces you have seen today also lets you select some of them instead of spamming.

Post new pictures after your visit is over

Post new pictures after your visit is over

 

Switch off the flash

Some museums allow visitors to take pictures, but the flash should always be off. Flash is considered destructive to art objects’ material and museums usually make sure this message reaches its visitors. There are objects so fragile they are even covered with a protective curtain which you need to raise carefully to see them because just the surrounding thin light is already harmful for them.

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